The Temple Institute: A Day in the Life of the Holy Temple: The Wine Libation

The Wine Libation

Finally, the last priest in this lottery receives the task of bringing the 1/4 hin (app. 1 quart) measurement of wine which is poured out on the altar for the morning wine libation that accompanies the daily sacrifice.

Thus, a total of 13 priests receive appointments of Divine service in the second daily lottery. The entire staff needed to offer the daily sacrifice is now in place, and after these priests conclude their tasks, they return to the Chamber of Hewn Stone for the recitation of their morning prayers.

"May the Daily Sacrifice Be Found Acceptable Before You"

Upon returning to the Chamber of Hewn Stone, the lottery overseer instructed the priests that it was time to recite the "Hear O Israel" prayer, together with its corresponding blessing. They also recited the Ten Commandments, since these embody the main principles of the Torah (Maimonides).

After both the daily sacrifice and the incense offering are concluded, the priests will raise aloft their hands and deliver the "priestly blessing" upon the congregation of Israel assembled in the Holy Temple. In the meantime, they now recite these abbreviated prayers, as it was most fitting for those who have engaged in offering the daily sacrifice to now beseech G-d that the sacrifice should be pleasing before Him, accepted, and looked upon with favor.

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